I recently received an email from a Scope teacher that moved me deeply. She had just retired from teaching and was going through some old teaching materials, when she came across a letter I’d written to Scope teachers a couple of years ago.

Scope's debate/scavenger hunts are a great way to practice analyzing arguments. Now we've created a lower-level version for students who need more scaffolding.
 

We love this Sticky Note Museum activity from 7th-grade ELA teacher Jennifer Stahl—and not just because it involves a microphone! Jennifer gets her students up and out of their chairs by having them display their answers to Scope's critical-thinking questions on sticky notes around the classroom. Then students use a microphone to present their answers and respond to their classmates.

 

We were moved and inspired by Nick Ventura's story of grit and triumph after suffering a traumatic brain injury (Scope's May 2017 narrative nonfiction), and we think that your students will be as well. After reading the article, use the essential questions to kick off a class discussion, then have students create their own PSAs about helmet safety.

 

 

The Lazy Editor is a short and fascinating nonfiction text filled with grammar and writing mistakes for your students to find and fix. From subject-verb disagreement and pronoun problems to repetitive sentence structure, the errors in the Lazy Editor are carefully calibrated to the middle-school writer.

Do your students get tripped up when it comes to central ideas and supporting details? If so, you will love this idea from Scope advisor and 6th grade ELA teacher Joanne Canizaro.