Amy Sylvester's fun and creative multimedia project is just the thing for those final weeks of the school year. After reading, discussing, and analyzing a Scope play, Amy's students turn it into a gorgeous digital flipbook by recording a reading of the play and illustrating it themselves.

 

Scope debates are a fantastic way for students to practice evaluating an argument, identifying supporting evidence, and writing a well-crafted argument essay. Students complete a text-marking activity, engage in a spirited debate, then use our Debate/Essay Kit to write their own argument essay.

Teacher Kim Wagner returns to the Scope Ideabook with another WOWSA idea. We are in love with how she uses subheads for summarizing, exploring text structures, and identifying central ideas. So doable! So delightful!

You're in luck! In honor of the unluckiest day of the year—Friday the 13th—we have a fascinating informational text all about why superstitions remain part of our culture. In the February issue of Scope, we paired the article with our play about the discovery of King Tut's tomb and the curse supposedly attached to the famous pharaoh. But the informational text also works on its own.

The article "Can She Be Saved?" in your December/January issue is one of our all-time favorites. It's about Ishanga, an orphaned baby elephant who nearly died after poachers killed her mother. Though Ishanga's story has a happy ending, the global problem of poaching continues to decimate wildlife, particularly in parts of Africa and Asia. We hope your students will be inspired to learn more about poaching, including why it's a problem and what can be done to solve it.

Here at Scope, we feel quite blessed that we get to spend our days reading books and scouring libraries to research and write articles for you and your students. It seems like we discover something new and fascinating every day. (Visit our offices at any given time and you’re bound to hear, “I just discovered the COOLEST thing!”)